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Phoenix Criminal Defense Law Blog

Enforcement Of Out-of-State Protection Orders In Arizona

It is not unusual to want to start over in a new state after a divorce or breakup with the parent of your child or children. It is difficult enough to deal with custody and other familial issues when you move, but it is even more difficult if you also have an order of protection against an abusive ex-partner or spouse. If you are moving or have moved to Arizona and you have an order of protection, contact an experienced family law attorney to ensure that your order is valid.

Three types of highly addictive prescription medications

If your doctor has suggested that you take a prescription medication, you may want to take the time to ask about the drug's side effects. In particular, you may also really want to learn about how addictive the medication may be. While the original reason for taking a drug may be legitimate, some medications can create addictions that make it difficult for people to stop using the drug. This can initiate a very negative cycle in a person's life.

According to Healthline, medications often given to people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder may become abused because of their ability to help them stay awake and feel more alert. Ritalin and Adderall are two commonly known and used stimulants that have addictive qualities.

What is first degree murder?

Like many Arizona residents, you may be aware that a charge for a criminal offense may be identified by different degrees such a first degree, second degree or third degree. When it comes to a charge of murder, do you really understand what first degree murder means or what acts might result in a person being accused of this level of crime? If you or someone you know is accused of first degree murder, it can be important to know this.

As explained by the Arizona legislature, first degree murder is a class 1 felony. Anyone convicted of this crime may be sentenced to life in prison or to death. In addition to taking premeditated actions that would knowingly or intentionally cause the death of another person, other factors can contribute to this charge. A defendant might be accused of first degree murder if a person dies during the course of other alleged actions. These include certain drug crimes, sexual assault, arson, burglary, robbery and more.

Preparing for more DUI enforcement

As the summer season has gotten into full swing now, Arizona residents everywhere may be eagerly looking forward to the quintessential summer holiday, the Fourth of July. Whether plans involve staying local or hitting the road to a favorite lake or even another state, enjoying a beer, cocktail or glass of wine is a normal part of a holiday celebration. While this is indeed a standard practice and by no means indicates that a person has an alcohol problem, it may well open the door to legal problems if stopped by an officer when driving after consuming that beverage.

The Arizona Department of Public Safety has made it be known that all across the state, enforcement of suspected driving under the influence will ramp up during the Fourth of July holiday. Because the actual holiday is on a Tuesday this year, that means the celebrations and associated enforcement can be expected to step up by the prior Saturday. Areas have been targeted based in part upon accident data from the same holiday period two years ago.

Understanding DNA analysis

Arizona residents who face criminal charges may be aware that prosecutors might be waiting for results of forensic testing to be used in their cases. Defense attorneys may also be interested in and able to make use of the results of such testing. While prosecutors may be looking for test results that support an arrest and a conviction, defense teams may be looking for test results that may help prove their clients' innocence. But, just how is a person's DNA actually tested?

The National Institute of Justice explains that the first step in the process of evaluating DNA is to isolate the actual DNA from other materials included in the sample that was received. Once isolated, the DNA may be duplicated to allow more testing to take place. The DNA is then processed and tested and eventually an identification of the type may be achieved. After this, teams may analyze the results and prepare a case report.

Man held on $1 million bond, accused of murder

Anyone in Arizona who has ever been accused of a crime knows that once media reports become public about the events, it can be very difficult for people to feel like they have a chance at effectively defending themselves. All too often reports with very limited information are provided that make it easy for the public to essentially convict people in their minds. However, even in the face of things like this, defendants should try to stay focused on the criminal justice process and their rights.

Such is the case of one man who today has been put in jail on a $1 million bond after being accused of killing his girlfriend and the mother of his infant daughter. The arrest comes almost one month after the last time that the woman was seen or heard of. There is no conclusive information about where she may be but the theory is that she is dead and it is her boyfriend who is facing charges in the case.

Purpose of police video footage questioned

Many people in Arizona may be aware that police, sheriff and other members of law enforcement agencies may wear cameras on their uniforms and take video of different situations including those in which people may be or are ultimately arrested. This practice is not specific to Arizona as departments all around the nation have been putting police body camera technology to use for a while now. However, some people are beginning to question the purpose of taking these videos.

Some have indicated that a primary goal of capturing video footage of police encounters with the public is to increase police accountability and reduce instances of police misconduct or brutality. If such things took place, the video footage could be used to hold officers accountable. But what appears to some to have been happening is that the footage that is captured by the police body cameras is used more for actual law enforcement than it is for such officer accountability.

The Prenuptial Agreement You Didn't Know You Had

If you plan to promise to love, honor and cherish your partner until death do you part, the idea of making a prenuptial agreement is likely the farthest thing from your mind. In fact, if someone suggested that you and your intended sign such a contract, you may have felt insulted or even angry.

Premarital agreements, like life insurance policies, are something people put in place hoping they never have to use them. However, what you may not realize is that, if you and your spouse don't have a prenuptial contract, in the unfortunate event that your marriage ends, the Arizona courts already have a plan in place.

Probation violation added to list of offenses for defendant

Arizona residents who are on probation or parole may be required to wear ankle bracelets so that law enforcement officers or courts can track their locations or their comings and goings from a residence. If such an order is placed, that means anyone who fails to comply with the request may be in jeopardy of violating their parole or probation agreement. This is something that may subject a person to additional penalties.

That is precisely what one man that is apparently being sought by authorities may be facing if he is found by law enforcement. According to reports, the man has been accused of commiting several criminal acts in as many as five different states. He is said to have been charged with identity theft, aggravated driving under the influence and the failure to register as ordered as a sex offender. He was apparently on probation although it is not known for which offense he was serving a probation sentence.

What happens if I violate my probation?

Have you been placed on probation in Arizona? Whether your probation sentence was in lieu of time in jail or prison or whether it was in addition to some period of incarceration, you will want to have a good understanding of the terms of your sentence. In particular, you should know what may happen if you break your probationary contract.

According to the Arizona State Legislature, there are two things that may happen to you if you violate your probation agreement. One of these is that the court may actually revoke your right to probation altogether. This means that you may actually be required to serve a sentence in prison or jail. If you may have two different probation agreements at one time, any time in a jail or prison may need to be served consecutively not concurrently, even though the probation sentences were able to be served concurrently.